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Posts Tagged ‘weather lore’

I remember, as a child, my parents always picked up a Farmer’s Almanac and kept it in the magazine rack in the bathroom beside the JCPenny catalog and several issues of Better Homes and Gardens. I loved thumbing through the pages, reading the articles and predictions for the up coming year. I was so fascinated with its tips and information. Why have I never picked on up as an adult? I’ll have to work on that. In the mean time we can all save a tree or two by looking here for the Old Farmer’s Almanac online.

The tips and gardening stuff evade me, but the old wive’s tales and lore concerning weather always stuck. Maybe it was because my mom would say, “red sky at night, sailor’s delight. Red sky in the morning, sailor’s take warning,” if the sky was giving any sort of hints away as to what She had in store for us. This little saying has yet to let me down and I even share it with my children- reminding them that we don’t need meteorologists and their fancy-schmancy super-ultra-mega dopplers. Everything we need to know about the weather is all around us. The sway of the trees, the direction of the leaves, the shapes of the clouds, the smell in the air- it’s all right there and more accurate than the weatherman.

My love of these sayings continues on and I have collected over the years a giant collection from all over the world. And here, I would like to share them all with you. Enjoy it, then turn off the computer and go outside to see what nature is telling you.

Weather Lore

Some well known and some not so well known sayings about weather patterns.

“A summer fog for fair,

A winter fog for rain.

A fact most everywhere,

In valley or on plain.”

 

“The moon and the weather may change together,

But a change of the moon, will not change the weather.”

 

“When the dew is on the grass,

Rain will never come to pass.

When grass is dry at morning light,

Look for rain before the night.”

 

“When leaves show their undersides, be very sure that rain betides.”

 

“If a cat washes her face o’er her ear,

‘tis a sign the weather will be fine and clear.”

 

“If a circle forms ‘round the moon,

‘Twill rain soon.”

 

“The farther the sight, the nearer the rain.”

“Rain long foretold, long last,

Short notice, soon will pass.”

 

“Catchy drawer and sticky door,

Coming rain will pour and pour.”

 

“The winds of the daytime wrestle and fight,

Longer and stronger than those of the night.”

 

“Sun sets Friday clear as bell,

Rain on Monday sure as hell.”

 

“No weather’s ill if the wind be still.”

 

“The more cloud types present, the greater the chance of rain or snow. ”

 

“If bees stay at home, rain will soon come,

If they flay away, fine will be the day.”

 

“The sudden storm lasts not three hours

The sharper the blast, the sooner ’tis past.”

 

“A ring around the sun or moon, means rain or snow coming soon.”

“Trace in the sky the painter’s brush,

The winds around you soon will rush.”

 

“Rainbow in the morning, Shepherds take warning.

Rainbow at night, Shepherd’s delight.”

 

“When clouds look like black smoke,

A wise man will put on his cloak.”

 

“When leaves turn their back ‘tis a sign it’s going to rain.”

 

“Evening red and morning gray

Helps the traveler on his way.

Evening gray and morning red

Brings down rain upon his head.”

 

“Evening red and morning gray,

Two sure signs of one fine day.”

 

“Evening red and weather fine.

Morning red, of rain’s a sign.”

 

“An evening gray and a morning red

Will send the shepherd wet to bed.”

 

“The higher the clouds, the finer the weather.”

 

“When clouds appear like rocks and towers,

The earth will be washed by frequent showers.”

 

“I know ladies by the score

Whose hair foretells the storm;

Long before it begins to pour

Their curls take a drooping form.”

 

“When chairs squeak

It’s about rain they speak.”

 

“If salt is sticky and gains in weight,

It will rain before too late.”

 

“Pale moon rains; Red moon blows.

White moon neither rains or snows.”

 

“If smoke hovers low near the ground it is likely to rain.”

 

“When sounds travel far and wide,

A stormy day will betide.”

 

“Cold is the night

When the stars shine bright.”

 

“Mares’ tails and mackerel scales

Make lofty ships carry low sails.”

 

“When the wind is out of the east,

‘Tis neither good for man nor beast.”

 

“When the wind is in the north. The skillful fisher goes not forth;

When the wind is in the cast, ‘Tis good for neither man nor beast;

When the wind is in the south, It blows the flies in the fish’s mouth;

But when the wind is in the west, There it is the very best.”

 

“Fish bite least

With wind in the east.”

 

“When the wind backs; and the weather glass falls

Prepare yourself for gales and squalls.”

 

“When the glass falls low,

Prepare for a blow;

When it rises high.

Let all your kites fly.”

 

“When the ditch and pond affect the nose,

Look out for rain and stormy blows.”

 

“A coming storm your shooting corns presage,

And aches will throb, your hollow tooth will rage.”

 

“If your corns all ache and itch,

The weather fair will make a switch.”

 

“If birds fly low

Expect rain and a blow.”

 

“If the rooster crows on going to bed,

You may rise with a watery head.”

 

“Trout jump high

When a rain is nigh.”

 

“If clouds move against the wind, rain will follow.”

 

“Cats and dogs eat grass before a rain.”

 

“A wind in the south

has rain in her mouth.”

 

“Onion skins very thin

Mild winter coming in;

Onion skins thick and tough

Coming winter cold and rough.”

 

“A swarm of bees in May

Is worth a load of hay.”

 

”If March comes in like a lamb, it goes out like a lion; if it comes in like a lion, it goes out like a lamb.”

 

“Plant your beans when the moon is light,

You will find that this is right;

Plant potatoes when the moon is dark,

And to this line you’ll always hark;

But if you vary from this rule,

You will find you are a fool;

Follow this rule to the end.

And you’ll have lots of dough to spend.”

 

“When oak is out before the ash,

‘Twill be a summer of wet and splash.

But if the ash before the oak,

‘Twill be a summer of fire and smoke.”

 

“When the swallow’s nest is high, summer is dry

When the swallow’s nest is low, you can safely reap and sow.”

 

“A cow with its tail to the West makes the weather best,

A cow with its tail to the East makes the weather least”

 

“Those who bathe in May, will soon be under clay,

Those who bathe in June bathe a bit to soon.”

 

“The louder the frog, the more the rain.”

 

“The first snow comes six weeks after the last thunderstorm in September.”

 

“If February brings drifts of snow

There will be good summer crops to hoe.”

 

“When sheep gather in a huddle,

tomorrow we will have a puddle.”

 

“Expect the weather to be fair

When crows fly is pairs”

 

“If woolly worms are dark, the coming winter wilt be severe.”

 

“When ladybugs swarm,

Expect a day that’s warm.”

 

“When chickens scratch together,

There’s sure to be foul weather.”

 

“If the groundhog sees his shadow on February 2nd, there will be six more weeks of winter.”

 

“When pigs carry sticks,

The clouds will play tricks;

When they lie in the mud,

No fears of a flood.”

 

“When cattle lie down during a light rain, it will pass soon.”

 

“When walls in cold weather begin to show dampness, the weather will change.”

 

“If the sparrow makes a lot of noise, rain will follow.”

 

“The moon and the weather

May change together;

But change of the moon

Does not change the weather”

 

“If the moon lies on her back, She sucks the wet into her lap.”

 

“Tipped moon wet: cupped moon dry.”

 

More very olde wives tales and sayings concerning the weather.

 

“You time fifteen seconds while you count how many times a cricket chirps. Then you add thirty-nine to it. This is called “A poor man’s thermometer.”

 

“When pine cones close, bad weather is coming.”

 

“Flowers of the morning glory and scarlet pimpernel open when it’s sunny, and close when rain is due.”

 

“The first frost in autumn will be exactly six months after the first thunderstorm of spring.”

 

“As many days old as is the moon on the first snow, there will be that many snowfalls by crop planting time.”

 

“A warm Christmas, a cold Easter.”

 

“If a squirrel’s tail is very bushy or they are collecting big stores of nuts in autumn, then a severe winter should be expected.”

 

I hope my friends in the US are staying cool today with all the record highs and excessive heat warnings!

Lauryn

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